Underworld Rookie Mock Draft Recap #9

by Steve Smith, May 21, 2021

The RotoUnderworld community will be partaking in a series of 12-team, five-round rookie mock drafts, running through the spring and summer. The mock drafters will be comprised of PlayerProfiler writers/analysts, our friends in the Patreon community, and our good friends over at The Breakout Finder. While these pieces will include quick-hitting notes from the drafters about why they made their selection, our writers will take turns recapping the festivities and adding their own unique perspectives.

Rookie Mock Draft Recap #9 – SuperFlex/TE Premium

NFL teams have spoken, adding critical pieces to the 2021 rookie class puzzle. Armed with draft capital and landing spots, the Underworld and Friends promptly assembled in the draft room. This fifth installment of this SuperFlex/TE Premium Rookie Mock Series began on May 2nd. Comparing the results of this mock with pre-NFL Draft editions is fun. It highlights risers/fallers,  identifies values, and challenges us to consider if we are over or underreacting to player situations.

fantasy-football-dynasty-league-rankings

It’s mid-May and rookie hype is high. Dynasty managers can acquire the shiny and new. This is one element that makes this format great. But remember, the rational person makes decisions based on intelligent thinking and value, not on emotion. Our group of mock draft aficionados have put in the time and provided their insights. Let’s check it out.

1.01 – Kyle Pitts, TE, Atlanta Falcons

Analyst: Garrison Mindrup (@GarrisonMindrup)
Rationale: I don’t care about your QBs or if Rookie TEs don’t produce. Give me the best player in the draft! A big wide receiver that gets bonus points for being listed as a TE.

1.02 – Trevor Lawrence, QB, Jacksonville Jaguars 

Analyst: Steve Smith (@stevenr_smith)
Rationale: 
Full disclosure, I entered this mock expecting to draft Trey Lance with this pick. I’ll take what falls to me, and that happens to be the best QB prospect in the class.

 

1.03 – Trey Lance, QB, San Francisco 49ers

Analyst: Will Barrett (@Will_Barrett1)
Rationale:
I was originally going to go with Fields here. With Lance on the 49ers and Fields on the Bears, I’m starting to like Lance’s situation and upside more.

 

1.04 – Justin Fields, QB, Chicago Bears

Analyst: Aaron Stewart (@aaronstew09)
Rationale:
The Bears were top-12 in Pass Plays in each of the past two seasons. Plus Fields has dual-threat capability.

 

1.05 – Najee Harris, RB, Pittsburgh Steelers

Analyst: Pedro Reyna (@petesake_)
Rationale:
I can’t explain it, got a gut feeling about Najee, possibly another one of the “great” Pitt RBs.

 

1.06 – Zach Wilson, QB, New York Jets

Analyst: Joshua Benjamin (@joshbenjaminNFL)
Rationale:
Wilson’s ability is no doubt a double-edged Katana! With that said, I’m in lust with what the Jets did to address the points factory this offseason. He’s not the QB that you take home to mom, he’s the QB you take to Vegas for the weekend!

 

1.07 – Travis Etienne, RB, Jacksonville Jaguars 

Analyst: Ron Stewart (@ronstewart_)
Rationale:
The best running back in the class got first round draft capital, be excited.

1.08 – Javonte Williams, RB, Denver Broncos

Analyst: Ray Marzarella (@rayraymarz)
Rationale: Denver was the best under-discussed landing spot for a rookie RB. Williams may only be a second-round pick in real life, but the Broncos trading up to pick him is enough for him to leapfrog Chase as the pick for me here.

 

1.09 – Ja’Marr Chase, WR, Cincinnati Bengals

Analyst: Andrew Quinn (@AQuinnff)
Rationale:
Best WR prospect in the class gets to team back up with his college QB. Get your popcorn ready.

1.10 – Mac Jones, QB, New England Patriots

Analyst: Akash Bhatia (@FantasyKash)
Rationale:
The best strategy in SuperFlex rookie drafts the past few years has been to take the QB drafted in the first round who falls.

 

1.11 – Devonta Smith, WR, Philadelphia Eagles

Analyst: Cody Carpentier (@CarpentierNFL)
Rationale: This one pulls at my heart strings, but at this point Smith is the only value here. He has the ability to come in Day 1 and garnered 100 targets from Jalen Hurts. With only Jalen Reagor as a threat in the receiver room and Dallas Goedert at TE, I think Smith has the opportunity to be the second-most effective receiver in this rookie class.

 

1.12 – Rashod Bateman, WR, Baltimore Ravens

Analyst: Jaylen Glenn (@JayyyG_FF)
Rationale:
Bateman checks all the boxes analytically: early declare with first round draft capital, 94th-percentile Breakout Age, multiple 30.0-percent-plus College Dominator Rating seasons, so I gladly ignore landing spot here.

 

Round 1 Takeaways

Grab a cup of water, this mock comes out of the gate HOT!

Setting flames to a stacked QB class, Kyle Pitts boldly goes at the 1.01. That’s planting a flag, love the assertiveness! The win-win move is probably trading back and still acquiring Pitts – that’s not an option in this mock. After all, the top 30 in Lifetime Value Points on PlayerProfiler’s SF/TEP dynasty rankings is dominated by QBs and RBs.

In 2020, Travis Kelce caught 105 of 145 targets for 1,416 yards and 11 TDs. He finished No. 2 overall in receiving yards. In a TE premium format (four-point passing TDs), this slotted him behind Russell Wilson (QB6) in total fantasy points. On a per game basis, Kelce recorded 20.7 fantasy points, which lands him behind the QB11. Darren Waller’s position leading 107 receptions put the TE2 behind Justin Herbert at QB10. Pitts is an uber talent, but the rookie has significant work to do to match the ultra-high expectations of this draft season.

Trey Lance was the key post-NFL Draft riser for quarterbacks. Paired with strong weaponry in the 49ers scheme makes his upside undeniable. Lance comes off the board as QB2 ahead of Fields. Our mock drafters are savvy, so this is not a first. Lance was drafted No. 3 overall (QB2) back in mid-March. Zach Wilson and Mac Jones were taken in their usual range, making for the same five QBs gone in Round 1. Travis Etienne is a steal at 1.07.

Reunited with his college QB, the WR1, aka Ja’Marr Chase, is another fantastic value at 1.09. Over five SF/TE mocks, Chase has been drafted as high as 1.04, but more often is available in the middle of the round. DeVonta Smith is now catching passes from old friend Jalen Hurts, which boosts him to a high point in our SF/TE mock series. Smith could be lined up for a healthy Target Share given his depth chart competition in Philly. Finally, Rashod Bateman slips to a low point of 1.12 after landing in the league’s worst passing offense.

 

2.01 – Rondale Moore, WR, Arizona Cardinals

Analyst: Garrison Mindrup (@GarrisonMindrup)
Rationale:
The most electrifying receiver in the draft who should start from Day 1 in three-WR sets.

 

2.02 – Jaylen Waddle, WR, Miami Dolphins

Analyst: Steve Smith (@stevenr_smith)
Rationale: The Dolphins invested the No. 6 overall pick to reunite Waddle with his college QB Tua Tagovailoa. With Miami remodeling their WR room, I like the dynamic playmaker’s chances of pushing for the WR1 job.

 

2.03 – Terrace Marshall, WR, Carolina Panthers

Analyst: Will Barrett (@Will_Barrett1)
Rationale:
I don’t mind the landing spot here for Marshall. Robby Anderson and Sam Darnold will be gone in 2022. He had a 33.4-percent (63rd-percentile) College Dominator Rating, a 19.2 year (84th-percentile) Breakout Age, he had ten touchdowns in seven games and averaged 104 receiving yards per game this past season.

 

2.04 – Michael Carter, RB, New York Jets

Analyst: Aaron Stewart (@aaronstew09)
Rationale:
Carter just barely missed Day 2 draft capital and, after seeing the rest of the RBs left on the board, I’m excited to get a talented RB on a weak depth chart.

 

2.05 – Trey Sermon, RB, San Francisco 49ers

Analyst: Pedro Reyna (@petesake_)
Rationale:
Landing in San Francisco in the Round 3 has boosted Sermon’s value and moves him into the RB4 conversation.

2.06 – Elijah Moore, WR, New York Jets

Analyst: Joshua Benjamin (@joshbenjaminNFL)
Rationale:
Double Down! Call it my “green back stack.” Moore is a great talent who can end up paying major dividends! Upside or die!

 

2.07 – Pat Freiermuth, TE, Pittsburgh Steelers

Analyst: Ron Stewart (@ronstewart_)
Rationale: 
Overshadowed by the hype of Kyle Pitts, Pat Freiermuth is quietly one of the better tight end prospects in the last couple of years.

 

2.08 – Kadarius Toney, WR, New York Giants

Analyst: Ray Marzarella (@rayraymarz)
Rationale: The slow rise of Kadarius Toney up the draft boards to this second-round range has been interesting to watch. He’s now likely at least locked into this area now that he’s secured his first round NFL Draft capital. He adds a different and unique element to the offense when considering the skillsets of the players around him, he has the sort of special teams ability the Giants have lacked since the days of Ron Dixon and Willie Ponder (editors note: damn, I’m old af), and he’s athletic enough to be used as a decoy X-receiver at worst while he acclimates to the pro game. He is a converted QB, so he has plenty of room to grow, though these kinds of players aren’t usually first round NFL Draft picks.

 

 

2.09 – Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR, Detroit Lions

Analyst: Andrew Quinn (@AQuinnff)
Rationale:
Would probably trade out of this pick, but I’ll take a flier on St. Brown. Has a good Breakout Rating and probably will walk into a decent role in Detroit.

 

2.10 – Dyami Brown, WR, Washington Football Team

Analyst: Akash Bhatia (@FantasyKash)
Rationale: 
With Day 2 draft capital and solid production at UNC even while competing with Dazz Newsome, Javonte Williams, and Michael Carter for targets, Brown is the easy pick here.

 

2.11 – Chuba Hubbard, RB, Carolina Panthers

Analyst: Cody Carpentier (@CarpentierNFL)
Rationale: 
Chuba brings the juice to any offense, going at the 2.11 behind the best fantasy running-back of all time. If anything happens to McCaffrey, Hubbard is a league winner.

 

2.12 – Nico Collins, WR, Houston Texans

Analyst: Jaylen Glenn (@JayyyG_FF)
Rationale: Prototypical X-receiver with great athleticism as shown by his 109.2 (89th-percentile) Speed Score. With Day 2 draft capital and no real WR behind Cooks, this feels like a good spot to take a shot on Nico.

 

Round 2 Takeaways

Similar to our last SF/TE mock, Round 2 is dominated by WRs. The deep QB class pushes dynamic playmakers Rondale Moore and Jaylen Waddle into the early second. Rondale broke out at an early age of 18.2 (99th-percentile) with 144 catches for 1258 yards and 12 TDs. Put any size concerns aside and DO NOT allow this athletic freak to slip into the middle of the round. Elijah Moore and Terrace Marshall come off the board next, adding to the value available here. Once the draft moves past the middle of the second, there is a noticeable tier drop. If selecting in the back half of this round, don’t be afraid to trade back or out.

Pat Freiermuth and Amon-Ra St. Brown are big draft day movers, but after them it gets dicey. At 2.09, St. Brown goes off the board 10 spots ahead of his pre-NFL Draft SF/TE mock ADP. Another early college breakout, he landed in a plum spot with the Lions. The fourth rounder will be competing with Tyrell WilliamsBreshad Perriman and Kalif Raymond for snaps to fill a whopping 313 vacated targets. St. Brown has the opportunity to be an early contributor in fantasy football.

Previously going at the end of the round, Freiermuth (don’t call him “Baby Gronk,” he hates it) climbs to 2.07. Drafted by the Steelers at No. 55 overall, this total package tight end has been overshadowed by Kyle Pitts. With the aggressive selection, Pittsburgh is hoping to properly fill the void left by retired Heath Miller. Freiermuth’s former draft slot is now occupied Nico Collins, who has steadily climbed throughout our SF/TE mocks. Collins went in the fifth round back in early March. However, big questions still remain about his QB situation.

3.01 – Amari Rodgers, WR, Green Bay Packers

Analyst: Garrison Mindrup (@GarrisonMindrup)
Rationale:
Should start in the slot and has massive YAC ability.

 

3.02 – Kenny Gainwell, RB, Philadephia Eagles

Analyst: Steve Smith (@stevenr_smith)
Rationale: Gainwell goes to a crowded backfield after falling to Round 5, but I still like the talent. The optimal move here would be to exploit that and move back later in the third with hopes of still acquiring him.

 

3.03 – Anthony Schwartz, WR, Cleveland Browns

Analyst: Will Barrett (@Will_Barrett1)
Rationale: I don’t mind the browns landing spot, Odell Beckham and Jarvis Landry are only getting older. Soon the world class sprinter will have a wide open receiver room.

 

3.04 – Hunter Long, TE, Miami Dolphins

Analyst: Aaron Stewart (@aaronstew09)
Rationale: 
With a nice 69th-percentile 21.8-percent College Dominator Rating and 23.3-percent junior season Target Share, Long is the succession plan for Mike Gesicki when he enters free agency next offseason.

 

3.05 – D’Wayne Eskridge, WR, Seattle Seahawks

Analyst: Pedro Reyna (@petesake_)
Rationale:
Eskridge has 4.45 (80th-percentile) speed and will be competing for WR3 snaps on a Russell Wilsonled offense.

 

3.06 – Tutu Atwell, Los Angeles Rams

Analyst: Joshua Benjamin (@joshbenjaminNFL)
Rationale:
Trade if possible. Tutu will most certainly start the year behind D-Jax for the outside stretch role. That role can pay big dividends with Stafford now at the helm.

 

3.07 – Tylan Wallace, WR, Baltimore Ravens

Analyst: Ron Stewart (@ronstewart_)
Rationale:
Wallace was my WR12 pre draft as a late second round option. Everyone’s giving him a big ding for landing spot, I’ll be buying the dip.

 

3.08 – Kellen Mond, QB, Minnesota Vikings

Analyst: Ray Marzarella (@rayraymarz)
Rationale: With all the chatter that Minnesota was eyeing up Justin Fields with their original first round selection, it makes sense to me to throw a dart at a player who may end up being the contingency plan at least by the 2023 season. Assuming he’d still have the services of one of more of Dalvin Cook, Justin Jefferson, (maybe) Adam Thielen, and Irv Smith, I’ll throw that dart.

 

3.09 – Josh Palmer, WR, Los Angeles Chargers

Analyst: Andrew Quinn (@AQuinnff)
Rationale: 
Palmer is still only 21 years old, and will be tethered to Justin Herbert for the next few years.

 

3.10 – Rhamondre Stevenson, RB, New England Patriots

Analyst: Akash Bhatia (@FantasyKash)
Rationale: 
With James White getting up there in age, Sony Michel‘s knee all but dead, Stevenson just has Damien Harris to compete with for touches. With Najee Harris, we saw Mac Jones is willing to check it down, even to a bigger back like Stevenson.

 

3.11 – Elijah Mitchell, RB, San Fransisco 49ers

Analyst: Cody Carpentier (@CarpentierNFL)
Rationale:
The best running back in the San Francisco backfield, hands down! Give me the uber athlete over a plodder and a couple old guys in Mostert and Wilson.

 

3.12 – Brevin Jordan, TE, Houston Texans

Analyst: Jaylen Glenn (@JayyyG_FF)
Rationale:
Despite poor testing, Jordan still has the YAC ability I like my TEs to have. Hopefully, the lack of established pass catchers in Houston can lead to some early career production.

 

Round 3 Takeaways

With 36 players drafted thus far, the breakdown is as follows: six QBs, nine RBs (three per round), 17 WRs, and four TEs. This distribution is nearly identical to our final pre-NFL Draft mock. Two-thirds of the players taken in Round 2 were wideouts. This drops to one-half for Round 3.

A trio of pass catchers comprised of Amari Rodgers, D’Wayne Eskridge and Josh Palmer are big third-round risers. Each of them received Day 2 draft capital and are tethered to exceptional quarterback play. Well, for now at least in Amari’s case. Rodgers and Eskridge both went in the early fourth in our final pre-NFL Draft mock. Drafted by the Chargers at No. 77, the 21-year old Canadian produced 99 receptions for 1,514 yards over four years at Tennessee despite shoddy QB play. He was never been chosen in a pre-NFL Draft mock, showing the impact of draft capital.

Kenny Gainwell sinks below Pick 20 (2.08) for the first time in five mocks. He fell to a crowded Eagles backfield. When factoring in Miles Sanders injury history and a depth chart that includes a couple of plodders, getting Gainwell in the third is solid value. The former rookie RB4 does have a 27.5-percent (60th-percentile) College Dominator Rating and a 13.8-percent (91st-percentile) College Target Share.

Notable players holding steady through the NFL Draft were Anthony Schwartz, Kellen Mond, Tylan Wallace, and Tutu Atwell. These upside prospects received Day 2 or early Day 3 draft capital, but find themselves down depth charts.

 

4.01 – Davis Mills, QB, Houston Texans

Analyst: Garrison Mindrup (@GarrisonMindrup)
Rationale:
A top high school recruit who could see the field very soon with Watson probably done.

 

4.02 – Dez Fitzpatrick, WR, Tennessee Titans

Analyst: Steve Smith (@stevenr_smith)
Rationale: 
Drafted in the fourth round to the Titans, I’ll take a shot on Dez using his athletic profile to land a role in a wide open wide receiver depth chart behind A.J. Brown.

Dez Fitzpatrick Advanced Stats & Metrics Profile

 

4.03 – Ihmir Smith-Marsette, WR, Minnesota Vikings

Analyst: Will Barrett (@Will_Barrett1)
Rationale:
Smith-Marsette’s metrics and production are average at best: a 61st-percentile College Dominator Rating, 55th-percentile YPR, and 61st-percentile Breakout Age. He never passed 800 receiving yards at Iowa, but he has no one to compete with for that number three receiver spot in Minnesota, great opportunity for him! He’s also a good special teamer.

 

4.04 – Gerrid Doaks, RB, Miami Dolphins

Analyst: Aaron Stewart (@aaronstew09)
Rationale:
A sneaky athletic (68th-percentile SPARQ-x score) RB with 87th-percentile Burst joining a team that wanted to get better at RB makes for a perfect fourth round dart throw!

 

4.05 – Shi Smith, WR, Carolina Panthers

Analyst: Pedro Reyna (@petesake_)

 

4.06 – Javian Hawkins, RB, Atlanta Falcons

Analyst: Joshua Benjamin (@joshbenjaminNFL)
Rationale: 
The best UDFA since the great James Robinson…too soon?

 

4.07 – Tre McKitty, TE, Los Angeles Chargers

Analyst: Ron Stewart (@ronstewart_)

 

4.08 – Jermar Jefferson, RB, Detroit Lions

Analyst: Ray Marzarella (@rayraymarz)
Rationale: Falling to the seventh round of the NFL Draft, and being parked behind D’Andre Swift and his Best Comparable Player in Jamaal Williams for the foreseeable future, all but nuked Jefferson’s value. But since we should never let ourselves fall victim to The Assumption of Rational Coaching, I’m still willing to take a chance on the early breakout and production profile at this stage of the proceedings.

 

4.09 – Mike Strachan, WR, Indianapolis Colts

Analyst: Andrew Quinn (@AQuinnff)
Rationale:
Day 3 draft capital to the Colts isn’t the most exciting in the world, but I’ll tell you what is: being 6-5 with an 87th-percentile Speed Score and 98th-percentile College Dominator Rating.

 

4.10 – Kyle Trask, QB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Analyst: Akash Bhatia (@FantasyKash)

 

4.11 – Simi Fehoko, WR, Dallas Cowboys

Analyst: Cody Carpentier (@CarpentierNFL)
Rationale:
 Michael Gallup is a free agent after the season. Expect Fehoko to follow in line shortly after as a competent No. 3 with requisite size and a 95th-percentile Speed Score.

 

4.12 – Kene Nwangwu, RB, Minnesota Vikings

Analyst: Jaylen Glenn (@JayyyG_FF)

 

Round 4 Takeaways

In Round 4, the aficionados have filling the board with several upside darts. With landing spots and draft capital moving the needle for several players, let’s take a closer look at a couple of potential bullseyes.

At Pick No. 119, Iowa State’s Kene Nwangwu was the first of three Minnesota Vikings Round 4 selections. On a depth chart with David Montgomery and Breece Hall, Nwangwu was used sparingly as a runner. He made his mark as a kick return ace, generating 2,470 yards (26.8 average) during his four year college career. Nwangwu’s athleticism jumps off the page. He has 4.37 (99th-percentile) speed with upper-percentile burst and agility. He will compete for a special teams role that can help him replace Mike Boone as the team’s third RB.

Another fourth round surprise was the Titans selecting Louisville WR Dez Fitzpatrick at Pick No. 109. Tennessee hadn’t drafted a receiver until they traded up to choose Fitzpatrick ahead of Amon-Ra St. Brown and Tylan Wallace. At 6-2, Fitzpatrick has the requisite size that the Titans covet in their WRs. The team is also fond of his route running skills, toughness and blocking ability. A.J. Brown will need help replacing Tennessee’s 224 vacated targets, making Fitzpatrick a potential late-round gem in rookie drafts.

 

 

5.01 – Seth Williams, WR, Denver Broncos

Analyst: Garrison Mindrup (@GarrisonMindrup)
Rationale:
Once a devy darling, now a late round steal. Should be the replacement for Sutton, who will be a free agent after this season.

 

5.02 – Chris Evans, RB, Cincinnati Bengals

Analyst: Steve Smith (@stevenr_smith)
Rationale:
Evans flashed early at Michigan, but academic issues forced him to miss his chance at a lead-back role in 2019. With 90-plus percentile burst and agility he could push for the No. 2 role behind Mixon.

5.03 – Jaelon Darden, WR, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Analyst: Will Barrett (@Will_Barrett1)
Rationale: 
Darden is entering the league in a crowded offense, but all he needs is an opportunity to show off his 94th-percentile Agility Score and his 90th-percentile College Dominator Rating. I think he can get an opportunity as a special teamer, he put up 414 special team yards in his freshman season.

 

5.04 – Briley Moore, TE, Tennessee Titans

Analyst: Aaron Stewart (@aaronstew09)
Rationale:
At this point of the draft, go for athletic upside. The 6-4, 250-pound TE has the workout metrics AND analytical profile we look for in tight ends. His 124.9 (92nd-percentile) SPARQ-x score is nearly identical to the departing Jonnu Smith‘s 127.0 (93rd-percentile) mark.

 

5.05 – Ian Book, QB, New Orleans Saints

Analyst: Pedro Reyna (@petesake_)

 

5.06 – Jalen Camp, WR, Jacksonville Jaguars

Analyst: Joshua Benjamin (@joshbenjaminNFL)
Rationale:
Camp lands in a crowded WR room in Jacksonville. However we’ve seen WRs come from obscurity in Jacksonville and I believe Camp has some intriguing aspects to his game! Worth the late dart throw.

 

5.07 – Kylin Hill, RB, Green Bay Packers

Analyst: Ron Stewart (@ronstewart_)

 

5.08 – Kylen Granson, TE, Indianapolis Colts

Analyst: Ray Marzarella (@rayraymarz)
Rationale: Tough to see where he fits into the Colts offense early on in his career given the crowded room, but getting some serious Trey Burton vibes surrounding a player who has the kind of athletic profile I’m drawn to at the TE position. He broke out at two different schools and has a 97th-percentile Breakout Age. I like him in the fifth of a TE Premium format.

 

5.09 – Larry Rountree, RB, Los Angeles Chargers

Analyst: Andrew Quinn (@AQuinnff)
Rationale:
Rountree has proven that he can handle volume, based on his College Dominator Rating and handling over 200 carries in just 10 games last CFB season.

 

5.10 – Cornell Powell, WR, Kansas City Chiefs

Analyst: Akash Bhatia (@FantasyKash)

 

5.11 – John Bates, TE, Washington Football Team

Analyst: Cody Carpentier (@CarpentierNFL)
Rationale: The No. 1 Agility Score among all tight ends in this class!
He only runs a 4.89, but a year learning behind Logan Thomas should do Bates good. It’s the fifth round and we are throwing darts anyways.

 

5.12 – Kenny Yeboah, TE, New York Jets

Analyst: Jaylen Glenn (@JayyyG_FF)

 

Round 5 Takeaways

All 60 picks are in and we have 26 WRs drafted in this mock. That translates to 43-percent of picks being spent on a WR. In contrast, only 16 RBs were drafted. This number has steadily fallen with each subsequent mock as drafters sour on this underwhelming RB class. After posting weak metrics or going undrafted, pre-draft prospects such as Jaret Patterson and Demetric Felton are absent from this mock.

In this TE premium format, our drafters take a gamble on several upside TEs in Round 5. Focusing on the right details, each of the tight-ends selected have one thing in common – athleticism. For instance, 6-5, 250-pound John Bates has an 11.20 (89th-percentile) Agility Score, while Indy’s Kylen Granson exhibits 75th-plus-percentile metrics across agility, burst and 40-time. Both prospects were welcomed to the NFL in Round 4. The late-round lesson here: bet on athletes. Granson is already impressing in rookie camp.

 

Conclusion

Thanks to the members of the Underworld and Friends that participated in this mock. Rest assured that the Underworld will be back with more mock drafts throughout the NFL offseason. Until then, keeping doing your homework, stay level-headed, and shine when it’s your turn on the clock. Good luck in your rookie drafts!